What Next after Week Two?

Congratulations on completing the lesson for Week Two.  Now it’s time to start putting things into practice!

You should start using the techniques covered right now, if possible, and continue with them each day throughout the following week.  If you think you might have any problems adhering to the daily practices, or need any clarification, get in touch right away with the course facilitator.

However, your first step should be to visit the Comments section below, as soon as you’re ready, and post your thoughts on the question for this week:

“What constitutes true human ‘virtue’ or makes a person genuinely admirable?  What qualities might define someone’s character as truly good or bad?”

As you think this over, consider how even a simple act like answering this question and commenting on the forums might relate to your personal conception of virtue.  How could your interaction with others be made completely in harmony with your own core values?

Here’s a second question for you to consider, and discuss, if you want:

What’s the relationship between what’s truly “healthy” or beneficial for you and what’s genuinely “praiseworthy”?  How do these compare to what’s desirable or worth choosing to pursue in life?

Now go to the Comments section below and reply with your thoughts.

If there’s anything whatsoever you could use help with, either technical stuff or the course content, please don’t hesitate to contact the course facilitator.

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44 thoughts on “What Next after Week Two?”

  1. “What constitutes true human ‘virtue’ or makes a person genuinely admirable? What qualities might define someone’s character as truly good or bad?”

    -To remain generous towards self and others despite massive adversity. Charity, like François Hollande. Such is truly good.

    -To place limits on generosity, as a reaction to adversity. Such is truly bad.

    What’s the relationship between what’s truly “healthy” or beneficial for you and what’s genuinely “praiseworthy”? How do these compare to what’s desirable or worth choosing to pursue in life?

    1) Acting in accord with the Truth arising inside myself.
    2) To serve others (not feel entitled to be served by others, in some sort of misplaced neediness).
    Such is healthy and praiseworthy.

  2. True human virtue that is genuinely admirable is when a person is resolutely good. Someone who genuinely cares about the well being of himself and others as one.

  3. Disagree about kindness as the underlying virtue. For example, Justice is Justice, being tempered by kindness does not keep it from being cruel and unusual punishment. The fact that it is Justice prevents that. If it were cruel and unusual, then it would not be Justice.

    What makes a person admirable is how closely they follow the virtues and how well they apply them in their life. Simple as that.

  4. I think I am aware of paradox here – that someone with true human virtue acts as if everything is of great importance but also knows that life is fleeting. For me, the virtues are around doing good for others and the world.
    When life is on track, I feel that the healthy and praisworthy are in harmony and exemplified in my vocation with poetry therapy. I am able to keep up momentum and work hard and productively. Sometimes though, smaller-minded motivations creep in and I lose focus.

  5. I think Seld-discipline, courage and integrity are admirable and loyalty and perseverance. For example, I admire couples that have been together all their lives through ups and downs. I also admire priests who have dedicated their lives to a cause. So for me, commitment is also admirable.

    When i think of bad characters images of Adolf Hitler spring to mind – the type of people that physically and mentally hurt one another to no logical reason. But, leaders, even if bad seem to hold some characteristics that we admire such as standing up for what they believe in and not listening to what people say or do – even the leaders who we would call bad.

  6. I struggled with this. The best answer I’ve arrived at so far is that true virtue lies in striving to be the person you hope and pray your children will also become. I may build upon that answer some day, but for here and now, I think that best sums it up.

  7. Q1: For me is selflessness. When you show more interest in others than in your own problems, particularly in those that you know you can help in some way.

    Q2: In relation to Q1 above, sometimes giving too much of yourself can be a drain on your emotional reserves, though would still be praiseworthy. Stepping back a little so you can sustain selflessness over time would be more healthy.